Giáo Dục

Have a nice day

have a nice day

An expression of farewell, used especially in somewhat formal settings, such as when an employee is addressing a departing customer.

A: “Thanks for your help!” B: “No problem—have a nice day!”

nice

See also: have

Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Have a nice day.

 and Have a good day.; Have a nice one.; Have a good one.

and

an expression said when parting or saying good-bye. (This is now quite hackneyed, and many people are annoyed by it.)

Clerk: Thank you. Tom: Thank you. Clerk: Have a nice day.

Bob: See you, man! John: Bye, Bob. Have a good one!

nice

See also: have

McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

have a nice day

Also, have a good day; have a good one. A cordial goodbye to you. For example, , or , or . These expressions have become synonymous with a polite farewell. The first originated about 1920 but, like the variants, became widespread only after 1950.

nice

See also: have

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Have a nice ˈday!

(, ) a friendly way of saying goodbye, especially to customersnice

See also: have

) a friendly way of saying goodbye, especially to customers

Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Have a nice day

and HAND Good-bye and good luck. (see also

Thank you. Have a nice day.

Good-bye and good luck. (see also Have a good one .)

Xem thêm :  Soạn bài liên kết trong văn bản

nice

See also: have

and

McGraw-Hill’s Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

have a nice day

A cordial good-bye to you. This intrusive imperative became extremely common after 1950 among U.S. truckers who used it on their citizens-band radios. In Britain it often is put as or The latter, which may have its origin in the Middle English (ca. 1200) and was frequently used by Chaucer, apparently died out for some centuries and then was revived. It is often heard in America and occasionally is altered to Since the late 1960s these phrases have become ubiquitous. They often are used ironically, either knowingly or unconsciously. Following a precipitous drop in the New York Stock Market in October 1987, the telephone clerks employed by Pacific Brokerage continued to report to the company’s clients, as they always had, “This is Pacific Brokerage Calling. You just sold 30,000 shares of Widget Manufacturing at $1. Have a nice day.” Conceivably this message might have driven the investor who bought Widget at 32 straight out of the nearest window. Or take the insurance agent who said, “I’m sorry to hear about your husband’s death. Have a nice day.” By about 2000, however, had largely become a synonym of “good-bye,” and was taken no more literally than the “God be with you” that was the original source of that word. A related term increasingly heard in restaurants is which similarly induces teeth-gnashing irritation when voiced by a particularly incompetent waiter.

nice

See also: have

Xem thêm :  Cộng trừ nhân chia tiếng anh – các phép tính trong tiếng anh (2021) ✔️ cẩm nang tiếng anh ✔️

The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer


WORLD ORDER "HAVE A NICE DAY"


Check out what the buzz is all about! WORLD ORDER’s HAVE A NICE DAY is getting everyone talking (and watching). See how the crew unleashes itself in Akihabara. If you need an afternoon pickmeup or just want to put a smile on your face just click on play and have a nice day!

Related Articles

Back to top button